Tue Dec 11, 2018 London
X

The Steeple Times is an online magazine with a following of upto 880,000 unique views per day on our best day yet.

  • We have 91,000 daily subscribers by email.

  • We typically average around 320,000 unique views per day.

  • We currently have 65 contributing authors who range from students to the actor, writer and producer Steven Berkoff and the champion jockey Frankie Dettori.

Combining a mix of society's last word and both wit and wisdom, The Steeple Times covers food, drink and fine dining as well as luxury, travel, the arts, individuals of influence and current affairs in the United Kingdom, America and elsewhere. We are best described as being akin to "a cross between The Huffington Post and Private Eye".

 

The magazine's following is affluent, engaged and international. With 41% of readers coming from the UK and 38% from America, The Steeple Times also has strong presence within Canadian, Italian, German and Australian territories.

 

EDITORIAL

Editorial comment from Matthew SteeplesOur editor tells it like it is and he rarely minces his words

Investigating Tulisa

In the wake of the collapse of the Tulisa Contostavlos drugs trial, we examine the merits of investigative journalism

 

Tulisa Contostavlos declared she’d had a “rollercoaster of a week” after she was convicted of assault in one case yet saw off another after it was thrown out due to the “serious misconduct” on the part of key witnesses for the prosecution. Tonight, the singer will appear in a BBC Three documentary that will “lift the lid” on that trial and provide her with a sounding board to share her thoughts on investigative journalism in general.

 

Tulisa Contostavlos is keen to see tougher regulation of the media and investigative journalism
Tulisa Contostavlos is keen to see tougher regulation of the media and investigative journalism

On BBC Radio 4’s Today this morning, highlights of the programme – titled Tulisa: The Price of Fame – were played. In her comments, Contostavlos declared:

 

“I was set-up. It’s a class thing. A lot of people are forgiven quite easy and I feel like with me, because of the urban image and upbringing that I don’t belong here. Like people were putting me back in my place”.

 

Of why she went along with the famed and now shamed undercover reporter Mazher Mahmood and the Sun on Sunday, Contostavlos, who thought she was being offered a major film part, commented:

 

“It was all part of the façade… I was having to hold him off for 24-hours. It was about playing the game and making him believe I’m the bad guy”.

 

Mahmood’s sting – which involved the ‘fake sheikh’ trying to persuade Contostavlos to obtain 13.9kg of cocaine for him – was undoubtedly not in the public interest but those now calling for investigative journalism to be outlawed are wrong.

 

Also speaking on Radio 4, David Yelland, a former editor of The Sun, sensibly stated:

 

“Investigative journalism is a vital part of the media… We shouldn’t be condemning investigative journalism at all. A lot of things he [Mazher Mahmood] did in his career were superb… There are a lot of things in the world that need investigating and there are a lot that don’t”.

 

Chris Blackhurst, group content director of The Independent and Evening Standard, added:

 

“It is a question of proportion. There’s always a case for investigative journalism but there is a fine line between that and entrapment… Mazher Mahmood broke one of the best stories in my career – the Pakistani cricket scandal – and you can’t take that away from him”.

 

In the wake of the phone hacking trial and the collapse of the Contostavlos case, it is clear that there is a definite need for newspaper proprietors to reassess which stories ought to be worthy of undercover investigation and which should not. Entrapment of the kind that occurred when addict Heath Ledger was cruelly lured into ranting about his drug habits, for example, was certainly wrong and not in the public interest; but such examples as undercover exposes on corrupt Home Office officials and police officers are for the general good and must not be reigned in.

 

Britain still has a free press and long may it remain that way. We thankfully do not live in Putin’s Russia or Kim Jong-un’s North Korea and the kind of over zealous legislation called for by the likes of Contostavlos and the Hacked Off campaign will never provide any kind of solution.

 

 

Tulisa: The Price of Fame will air on BBC Three tonight, Monday 28th July, at 10pm.

 

 

Subscribe to our free once daily email newsletter here:[wysija_form id=”1″]

 

Comments

4 comments on “Investigating Tulisa”

  1. Perhaps the Judge fell asleep and missed crucial evidence, a jury that could not identify their asses from their elbows. I believe there was video evidence. The camera never lies?

    1. @ Jani Allan
      I knew Tertius Myburgh and Peter Feldman. Hope you are good, as you were a great columnist…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • ob_flush(); ?>