Tue Jul 16, 2019 London
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EDITORIAL

Editorial comment from Matthew Steeples Our editor tells it like it is and he rarely minces his words

Jog off

A phrase that should be consigned to history

 

Now “hijacked by chavs,” the phrase “jog on” first became prominent in The Football Factory film about football hooliganism.

 

This awful insult got wider use in recent days after a mother from Salford used it in response to someone who criticised her defence of rioters looting stores in a BBC interview. This oik-ish woman and her Kappa clad son are unfortunately not alone in their use of this dreadful way of telling someone to “f*** off.”

 

The dwarf who "jogs on"

On a trailer for another BBC show this morning I heard a dwarf use utter it when describing how he responds when people look at him. It appears that there aren’t many places that this choice phrase of the underclass is not now used. In this vein, that Sally Bercow, the speaker’s wife, uses it when replying to negative tweets about her husband is not at all surprising.

 

“Jog on” even gets abbreviated sometimes to “JTFO,” which according to urbandictionary.com “adds an element of gusto and offence, for those times when the simplicity of the original phrase just don’t relay your feelings as fully and emphatically as they could.”

 

Those using the insult are even given notes actions to accompany it on one site: “The phrase mentioned must be preceded by raising the fore finger and middle finger to create a ‘V’ sign to the recipient. This should be followed by a movement to the side with a clenched fist and thumb extended in the direction of the movement.”

 

A woman teaches a child some "jogging on" actions

On Facebook there is even a group named “The ‘Jog On’ Appreciation Society.” Fortunately it only has 15 members and thankfully their aim to “get the phrase into the Oxford English” doesn’t seem to have garnered much support.

 

I very much hope this phrase “jogs off” into oblivion. Sadly, though, I suspect it’ll still be jogging around for some time yet.

 

“Jog on” as used in the Football Factory – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPxZeiTGXIY

 

Simon Pegg “jogs on” – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoXfiSU_wqE&NR=1

 

An American in Cornwall “jogs on” – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrfGa_n5H2k&feature=related

 

A horrible middle class brat named Maddie “jogs on” – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7PTDfOq4Q0&feature=related

Comments

1 comment on “Jog off”

  1. Ive never heard this insult myself, but why is it so awful and terrible to tell someone to basically “keep jogging”? is there an innuendo that I am missing?

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