Tue Jul 16, 2019 London
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EDITORIAL

Editorial comment from Matthew Steeples Our editor tells it like it is and he rarely minces his words

No thanks needed

“Thank you for reaching out!”: a phrase that should be banned

 

“Thank you for reaching out” is a phrase that I’ve noticed is used far too frequently. During the Olympics, BBC presenters used it when medal winners gave a minute or two of their time to conduct an interview after a grueling challenge. If I’d been an Olympian, I’d probably have punched said presenter. “Well done on such a wonderful performance” is what should have instead been said as no “reaching out” had actually occurred.

 

An example of a “Thank you for reaching out!” message

This tedious quip, usually accompanied by an exclamation mark, is a misuse of the English language that seems to have been accepted in all walks of life with gusto. It’s used by call centre staff trying to flog direct debit mandates for phony charities and it’s used most probably by double glazing salesmen when someone actually bothers to spend five minutes listening to their drivel.

 

The origin of the phrase, I imagine, probably came from some Scientology or Holy Spirit Association for the Unification of World Christianity type cult. I can just hear a preacher thanking his audience for “reaching out” just as he pockets their substantial donation. On this basis, let’s consign this hideous phrase to where it belongs: Siberia.

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