Tue Jul 16, 2019 London
X

The Steeple Times is an online magazine with a following of upto 880,000 unique views per day on our best day yet.

  • We have 91,000 daily subscribers by email.

  • We typically average around 320,000 unique views per day.

  • We currently have 65 contributing authors who range from students to the actor, writer and producer Steven Berkoff and the champion jockey Frankie Dettori.

Combining a mix of society's last word and both wit and wisdom, The Steeple Times covers food, drink and fine dining as well as luxury, travel, the arts, individuals of influence and current affairs in the United Kingdom, America and elsewhere. We are best described as being akin to "a cross between The Huffington Post and Private Eye".

 

The magazine's following is affluent, engaged and international. With 41% of readers coming from the UK and 38% from America, The Steeple Times also has strong presence within Canadian, Italian, German and Australian territories.

 

EDITORIAL

The economy, politics and current affairs Money, power and its guiding forces

Sinking television

Sinking television

A review of Julian Fellowes’s “Titanic”

 

Against better advice, I watched all four episodes of Julian Fellowes’s Titanic television drama. Nothing much happened in the first three episodes but unlike many others, I preserved and watched the final episode on the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the White Star passenger liner.

 

Julian Alexander Fellowes, The Lord Fellowes of West Stafford DL pictured with his “turban-clad” wife Emma Joy Kitchener LVO. The pair, who reside at Stafford House near Dorchester, Dorset, changed their surname from Fellowes to Kitchener-Fellowes on 15th October 1998.

Fellowes is a man who has had remarkable success with both Gosford Park and Downton Abbey. After playing bit part roles in such series as Fantasy Island, Our Friends in the North and Aristocrats, his career took off in 2002 when Gosford Park won an Oscar for the Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen. Since then he has been ennobled and become a darling of the middle classes.

The RMS Titanic which sank on 15th April 1912 at 41°43'57"N, 49°56'49"W
The RMS Titanic which sank on 15th April 1912 at 41°43'57"N, 49°56'49"W
One of the RMS Titanic's dining rooms
The RMS Titanic's ornate Grand Staircase

Described by John Doyle of The Globe and Mail as “a high-grade nobs-and-slobs story,” viewing figures fell from 9 million to 3.5 million between episodes 1 and 3 with good reason. To me this was a drama that lacked pace and repeatedly rehashed the same tales. It was tediously futile and an utter waste of four hours of anyone’s time.

 

A scene from Fellowes’s Titanic featuring Toby Jones as John Batley and Maria Doyle-Kennedy as Muriel Batley

Fellowes’s Titanic was truly a damp squib of a drama. May it, like the 1,514 tragic souls lost on 15th April 1912, rest in peace.

 

View ITV1’s official website for Titanic at: http://mip.itvstudios.com/programmes/drama-comedy/618/titanic

 

For more information on The Titanic Memorial Cruise, go to: http://titanicmemorialcruise.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

0 comments on Sinking television

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *