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What is Lorem Ipsum?
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Why do we use it?
It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

Where can I get some?
There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don't look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.

Tag: 1909

May 8, 2017

Take Me To The Titanic

by Matthew Steeples

Apartment in mansion block in Sloane Square for sale for £6.2 million in spite of needing updating; it is within the building from which a Mayor of Chelsea lived and departed to his death on RMS Titanic   A third floor flat in a portered mansion block on Sloane Square has gone on sale for … Continue reading “Take Me To The Titanic”

April 23, 2017

Living Large

by Matthew Steeples

New Jersey mansion, complete with 58 rooms, for sale for equivalent sum to what it cost to build in 1909; the £37 million house’s original owner was a man whose extravagance knew absolutely no bounds   George Crocker (1856 – 1909) makes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Jay Gatsby seem like an amateur. Born in Sacramento and … Continue reading “Living Large”

April 25, 2016

A £65 million mansion

by Matthew Steeples

Hampshire estate Hackwood Park goes on the open market for £65 million – making it one of most expensive country houses ever offered for sale in Britain

February 24, 2016

Sting’s Steinway Sells

by Matthew Steeples

Musician Sting’s Steinway piano sells for a staggering £116,500 against estimate of just £30,000 to £50,000

March 22, 2014

The best of BADA

by Matthew Steeples

A roundup of the art worth seeing at BADA   The BADA Antiques & Fine Art Fair on Chelsea’s Duke of York Square is an annual showcase of art and antiques that range in price from £100 to £1 million. Here, The Steeple Times picks three of our favourite items on display that suit a … Continue reading “The best of BADA”

July 2, 2013

Chronicling a Masterpiece

by Matthew Steeples

A portrait of Albert Vickers by John Singer Sargent   Vickers is undoubtedly one of the best known names in British engineering and it is indeed sad that their final remaining plant will close at the end of this year following the company having been absorbed into BAE Systems.  

June 1, 2013

A bit of a steel

by Matthew Steeples

The Mittal family market one of their three “Billionaires’ Row” homes for £7 million less than they paid for it   One of the world’s richest men, Indian steel magnate Lakshmi Mittal paid £117 million in 2008 for No. 6 Palace Green in Kensington. He bought the property for his son, Aditya, from an Israeli-American … Continue reading “A bit of a steel”

May 17, 2013

A Northern Downton

by Matthew Steeples

The sale of one of the North of England’s finest Georgian homes   Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey has undoubtedly led to a revival in interest in English country houses both in Britain and America and now with the sale of Burrow Hall in the Lune Valley in Lancashire, there is an opportunity to acquire one … Continue reading “A Northern Downton”

March 14, 2013

Bankrupt in Barton Street

by Matthew Steeples

The story of “fallen tycoon” Brian O’Donnell, the differences between bankruptcy in the UK and Ireland and an £11 million mansion   In these straightened times, the media in general and the Daily Mail in particular quickly latch on to stories about benefit scroungers living in luxury homes. They’re less quick, however, with the exception … Continue reading “Bankrupt in Barton Street”

November 5, 2012

Boujis in the basement?

by Matthew Steeples

Matthew Steeples explores the story of an empty Kensington mansion   A multi-million pound 8-bedroomed house in Kensington isn’t anything unusual. In fact, rather, they’re ten a penny. In this, one of the wealthiest boroughs in the land, large, expensive homes are just the norm.   No. 1 Campden Hill, which is being marketed for … Continue reading “Boujis in the basement?”