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What is Lorem Ipsum?
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Why do we use it?
It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

Where can I get some?
There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don't look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.

Tag: Twitter handle

April 28, 2017

Another Corbyn Calamity

by Matthew Steeples

Matthew Steeples reports that Jeremy Corbyn’s attempt to enthuse a child in Harlow didn’t go down well; children and politicians should never mix   Yesterday, Jeremy Corbyn headed to Harlow, Essex. He gave a speech to an assembled audience – including a woman with an upside down Labour poster – and then picked up a … Continue reading “Another Corbyn Calamity”

September 21, 2014

Website of the Week: Proper Kid Problems

by Matthew Steeples

American lifestyle website Proper Kid Problems is a sartorial zeitgeist   We’ve previously featured a British website that celebrates red trouser wearing sorts and now we make an American sartorial zeitgeist our Website of the Week.

July 28, 2014

Matt Forde

by Matthew Steeples

“Who the f*ck is Matt Forde?” – allegedly the words of Noel Gallagher – are the first thing one encounters on accessing the website of this comedian and one time political advisor to the Labour Party. Nottingham born and the son of a former nun, Forde’s Twitter handles reads: “A talentless liar, a shameless sycophantic … Continue reading “Matt Forde”

April 22, 2013

Though Sally may be silly, it’s the case against her that is stupid

by Matthew Steeples

The reasoning for Lord McAlpine’s libel action against Sally Bercow just does not stack up   Sally Bercow, the speaker’s wife, is a loudmouth. We don’t dispute that. There’s little she won’t say or do to keep herself in the public eye and whether draped in nothing other than a sheet in the Palace of … Continue reading “Though Sally may be silly, it’s the case against her that is stupid”

October 15, 2012

“Grockles” and “Emmets”

by Matthew Steeples

Matthew Steeples discovers Michael Winner’s links to descriptions of unwelcome “out of towners”   My last linguistic rambling explored two words, “plebs” and “ladettes,” that, like Andrew Mitchell MP, truly need to be eliminated from our culture. The next two in this series, “grockles” and “emmets,” have far more amusing origins and truly sum up … Continue reading ““Grockles” and “Emmets””