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The Steeple Times is an online magazine with a following of upto 880,000 unique views per day on our best day yet.

  • We have 91,000 daily subscribers by email.

  • We typically average around 320,000 unique views per day.

  • We currently have 65 contributing authors who range from students to the actor, writer and producer Steven Berkoff and the champion jockey Frankie Dettori.

Combining a mix of society's last word and both wit and wisdom, The Steeple Times covers food, drink and fine dining as well as luxury, travel, the arts, individuals of influence and current affairs in the United Kingdom, America and elsewhere. We are best described as being akin to "a cross between The Huffington Post and Private Eye".

 

The magazine's following is affluent, engaged and international. With 41% of readers coming from the UK and 38% from America, The Steeple Times also has strong presence within Canadian, Italian, German and Australian territories.

 

Tag: waitress

March 31, 2017

Overheard – 31st March

by General

Clangers overheard and snippets spotted by readers of ‘The Steeple Times’   Ferry & Yah A PR maven at the Chiltern Firehouse loudly spoke into her mobile. She speedily told the person at the other end of the line: “Bryan Ferry is amazing. Yah. Super yah… I saw his son in 5 Hertford Street. That … Continue reading “Overheard – 31st March”

March 4, 2013

Noelle Reno: “What’s on your mantelpiece?”

by Matthew Steeples

The Steeple Times asks fashion entrepreneur Noelle Reno: “What’s on your mantelpiece?”   The Steeple Times shares “wit and wisdom”. What’s your guiding force? The weather… Or Tolstoy.   “Don’t get even, get medieval” is, in our humble opinion, a great motto. What’s yours? Eleanor Roosevelt: “Women are like tea bags. You never know how … Continue reading “Noelle Reno: “What’s on your mantelpiece?””

June 17, 2012

“Enjoy”: an overused word

by Matthew Steeples

It’s just not “enjoyable”   In a five star hotel last week, a waitress followed the delivery of every course with the phrase: “Please enjoy.” My guest and I commented on it each time and today, on a show named Come Dine With Me, I noticed that a hostess included the word “enjoy” anytime she … Continue reading ““Enjoy”: an overused word”

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