Tue Oct 15, 2019 London
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The Steeple Times is an online magazine with a following of upto 880,000 unique views per day on our best day yet.

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Combining a mix of society's last word and both wit and wisdom, The Steeple Times covers food, drink and fine dining as well as luxury, travel, the arts, individuals of influence and current affairs in the United Kingdom, America and elsewhere. We are best described as being akin to "a cross between The Huffington Post and Private Eye".

 

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A list of influence

A ranked assembly of individuals of note along with details of their achievements and quirks.

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

Dame Dorothy Tutin DBE (1930 – 2001)

Aloof yet versatile actress Dame Dorothy Tutin DBE (1930 – 2001) – Versatile and brilliant actress – A resident of a Chelsea houseboat named ‘Undine’ from 1953, Dame Dorothy Tutin was “one of UK’s most versatile actresses.”

A resident of a Chelsea houseboat named ‘Undine’ from 1953, Dame Dorothy Tutin was “one of UK’s most versatile actresses” and someone whom “bridged the gap between the classical grandes dames of the 1940s and the more modern performers of the 1960s.”

 

Lauded by Sir John Mills “as one of the best we ever had” and capable of “play[ing] almost anything,” this mother of two and wife of Z-Cars actor Derek Waring won two Olivier Awards and was known for her “husky voice” – which was dubbed “Tutinese.” She could be, supposedly, “very aloof.”

 

Tutin worked with everyone from Dirk Bogarde in A Tale of Two Cities (1958) to Sir John Gielgud in The Shooting Party (1985) and of her, Caryl Brahms wrote: “Miss Tutin is a small-scale hurricane. And once she is unleashed upon a part, there is bound to be, one feels, a short, sharp tussle. But Miss Tutin comes out on top, and having subdued it to her temperamental and technical measure, parades in it, all smiles and sequinned tears. She can be gay, pathetic, lively, stunned – part minx, part poet, part sex-kitten. A comedienne of skill and a pint-sized tragedienne.”

 

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