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It’s cricket

The perfect English country house comes to the market for £11 million complete with its own cricket pitch

 

A house that has been in the same ownership for 30 years normally would be described by estate agents as “requiring some updating”. Stanton Court in the north Cotswolds is an exception.

 

Stanton Court, Stanton, Gloucestershire, WR12 7NE
Stanton Court, Stanton, Gloucestershire, WR12 7NE
An unusual extra is a cricket pitch that is used by local teams
An unusual extra is a cricket pitch that is used by local teams

For sale for £11 million, this Grade II listed manor house in the village of Stanton – whose most famous resident is tennis player turned television presenter Sue Barker – stands in grounds of 62 acres that include gardens designed by Chelsea gold medal winner Rupert Golby, woodlands and a private cricket pitch.

 

Dating to the early 1600s, Stanton Court was “rescued from oblivion” by the architect and engineer Sir Philip Sidney Stott (1858 – 1937) in 1906. Stott, most famous for designing cotton mills, was a man described as being “passionate” about the countryside and during his final years he devoted much of his energies into preserving and restoring buildings in Stanton including Stanton Court itself.

 

Of the village itself, an edition of Country Life magazine from 1911 observed:

 

“At Stanton, Nature and man combined to create a rural Elysium and that Elysium has entirely escaped modern vandalism. It is true that there has been much renovation at several points in the village, and most especially at the Court itself. But this has been done with very considerable knowledge and respect of Cotswold traditions”.

 

One of four reception rooms
One of four reception rooms
A family room is situated at the heart of this home
A family room is situated at the heart of this home
An indoor swimming pool was added four years ago
An indoor swimming pool was added four years ago
One of nine bedrooms
One of nine bedrooms
Stanton Court stands in some 62 acres of land
Stanton Court stands in some 62 acres of land

 

The current owners of Stanton Court, equally, have devoted themselves to maintaining and improving this small estate. They are said to have “combined French flair and English traditional know-how to comprehensively redesign” the 23,891 square foot of accommodation on offer and carried out a major overhaul four years ago.

 

With 4 reception rooms and 9 bedrooms in the main house, Stanton Court also comes with 5 cottages, a staff annexe and array of outbuildings and leisure facilities. A swimming pool suite was built 2 years ago and aside from normally expected features such as wine cellars, there is even a beer store and a cricket pavilion.

 

Stanton Court is for sale through Savills.

 

 

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