Sun May 19, 2019 London
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Website of the Week: Sirimo.co.uk

A website that explains the legal restrictions on the rights to take photographs

 

Knowing your rights when it comes to taking photographs – especially in an age when most have iPhones and other smart devices with camera facilities – has never been more important.

 

Don't be in the dark about your rights when you take photographs
Don’t be in the dark about your rights when you take photographs

 

The website of a freelance photographer named Simon Moran contains an especially clear guide to this written by Linda Macpherson, a legal consultant, and for that reason we make it The Steeple Times Website of the Week.

 

On the site a PDF download by Macpherson that clearly explains the law is available and links to sites providing explanations for Australia and the United States of America are provided.

 

In Macpherson’s guide, we learn that taking photographs from a public place such a highway is normally acceptable but that there is a prohibition on taking business photographs in public places Parliament Square, Trafalgar Square and the Royal Parks without permission and payment of a fee.

 

The author explains that the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 restricts the disturbance and thus photography of certain species of wildlife to those with a relevant licence and that taking photographs of UK bank notes is also an offence without the written permission of the Bank of England.

 

Here, indeed, is a guide that clearly explains the rights of the public. It is well worth exploring.

 

A YouTube video by ‘televisionforfree’ is also worth watching. It provides an especially clear guide to the public’s rights when it comes to taking photographs of police officers.

 

 

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