Thu Nov 23, 2017 London
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OPULENCE & SPLENDOUR

Luxury and the artsFrom houses to cars and from Hockney to van Dyck, a profile of the best and the worst

Coins Not Cars

Coutts’ Index 2017 reveals it is coins and not classic cars that are the better performing ‘passion assets’

 

This week bankers to the super-elite Coutts revealed the findings of their 2017 Coutts Index. In the annual report so called ‘passion assets’ – such as fine wine, works of art and watches – are measured in terms of their returns and this year’s revelations include that whilst classic car prices have risen fourfold since 2005, their values fell 10.4% in the last year.

 

Other findings in the survey suggest the fine art market has gone down by 6.2% in the same period and that Old Master and 19th century art has declined some 40% since 2008. Coins remains the only category to have registered increasing prices in every year since 2005, rising more than 11% per annum on average.

 

Of the analysis, Coutts surmised: “The Coutts Index tracks the changing value of ‘passion’ assets such as fine wine, classic cars, jewellery, fine art and trophy property. 2016 saw a modest increase in the index of 1.2%, compared to an average annual increase of 5.3%, while the index has returned 76.6% since it was founded in 2005.”

 

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